A Saint of Special Education

Saint Raphael is the patron saint of special education. Raphael was a Roman Catholic teacher who spent a lot of time in prayer and helping the poor. He is well-known for his teaching abilities and his compassion for all mankind. When he became a saint, his work continues to help children throughout the world with disabilities and learning differences. His love of children makes him one of the most sought after teachers in the United States.

patron saint of special education

Raphael’s specialty was teaching reading, writing, science, music, history, geography, and philosophy. He was known to be an excellent teacher and was able to adjust his teaching methods depending on the students’ skills. In his schools, there were children from deaf and hard of hearing families as well as those with normal hearing abilities. It is said that he had a deaf child in his class who was so talented that he was able to bring him to school everyday.

There are stories about how his work took him across the country and to Latin America teaching the poor. One story says that he went to teach the deaf and dumb children in the slums of Buenos Aires. Some of the children had no idea how to read or write. However, they were able to tell him what they wanted to say and have them sign it. From there, he would teach them English.

When he went to work in the school in Mexico City, he met an American named Raymond Ludden. They became great friends and worked together. They were able to solve many problems that came up in their work, such as how to get students to pay attention. They also got to solve some cultural issues between the students and the Spanish speaking teachers. In return, they would do many jobs for each other including helping the homeless.

The children who did not speak Spanish learned to speak English when they became adults. They went on to become doctors, lawyers, accountants and even a President. Unfortunately, not all of them were able to go on to become successful in their profession. The Saint of Assissi became very upset because he saw so many children who were denied of their right to an education simply because they lacked the ability to speak Spanish. He decided that each year, three children would go uneducated just because they lacked a second language.

The Virgin of Guadalupe is said to have bestowed this position upon Saint Martin. This gave him the mission of creating schools where people from all over the world could learn the Spanish language. However, he was only able to construct thirty-two schools. These schools still operate to this day in Mexico and Central America. They still draw students from far and wide.

As time went on, he was able to expand the school and built more. He even constructed a school in Cuba. Cuba’s population consists mostly of Spaniards, so it was no surprise that he thought this would be a good idea. In addition, the Cuban government was receptive to his efforts because they needed people to help in their country.

Eventually, the work of the Saint of Spanish Lessons became a worldwide phenomenon. Students throughout the entire globe learned Spanish there. In fact, the United States had one of the largest Spanish speaking populations in the world. Today, in places like New York, California, and Miami, you can find people who are not simply able to speak Spanish, but actually want to be fluent. There is hope for everyone who wants to go beyond basic education and learns to embrace the patron saint of special education, even if it takes years and decades.

Cascia Talbert is a Catholic mother of five special needs kids. In 2018 she published the book, "Taking Care of Your Family's Health and Well-Being, Saints to Turn to and the Catholic Faith," available anywhere books are sold. She is also a professional flutist and an Avon Independent Sales Representative. You can learn more about Cascia on the following websites, cjsfunandgames.com and avoncrystallake.com. She lives in the Chicago suburbs with her husband, children and Baby, the playful black kitty.

Related posts